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1. Paul Taylor at Lincoln Center

Robert Kleinendorst and Christina Lynch Markham above Aileen Roehl of the Paul Taylor Dance Company in “Fibers” (1961) at the David H. Koch Theater. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times

Robert Kleinendorst and Christina Lynch Markham above Aileen Roehl of the Paul Taylor Dance Company in “Fibers” (1961) at the David H. Koch Theater. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times

Paul Taylor Dance Company continues its 60th anniversary season at Lincoln Center with performances every night from Tuesday to Sunday, as well as matinee shows on Saturday and Sunday. Highlights this week include “Cloven Kingdom” (Wednesday), “Esplanade” (Thursday), “Arden Court” (Friday), “Troilus and Cressida” (Saturday), and the world premiere of “Marathon Cadenzas” (Sunday).

Tuesday-Thursday at 7, Friday at 8, Saturday at 2 and 8, Sunday at 2 and 6.

http://tickets.davidhkochtheater.com/single/eventDetail.aspx?p=3669

 

2. “To invent on the spot” at MoMA

Dancers have been popping up in museums more and more lately, but this is a new–or rather, old–twist on the museum performance. Created in 1972 by Italian artist Jannis Kounellis, “Da Inentare sul Posto,” or “To invent on the spot,” places a violinist and ballet dancer in front of a painted canvas to improvise together, creating a work of art that constantly changes and evolves. This dance between ballerina, musician, and painting (as well as museum-goers) will occur over 40 times in the course of the exhibition for its patron, “Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New,” and it promises to be new each time.

MoMA. Now through April 19, 2014: Thursdays at 11, Fridays at 3, Saturdays at 1. Ballet dancers from the Brooklyn Ballet.

http://www.moma.org/explore/multimedia/videos/295/1405

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Written by Claire Salant

Claire Salant discovered dance when she was six years old in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She moved to New York to go to Barnard College, where she studied history, math, and dance. She is freelance dancer in New York, academic teacher to students of all ages, and she occasionally finds ways to combine the two. Currently she is working through a dance injury, and is therefore engaging the dance world off her feet rather than on them!