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When you write, you lay out a line of words. The line of words is a miner’s pick, a woodcarver’s gouge, a surgeon’s probe. You wield it, and it digs a path you follow. Soon you find yourself deep in new territory. Is it a dead end, or have you located the real subject? You will know tomorrow, or this time next year.

You make the path boldly and follow it fearfully. You go where the path leads. At the end of the other you find a box canyon. You hammer out reports, dispatch bulletins.

The writing has changed, in your hands, and in a twinkling, from an expression of your notions to an epistemological tool. The new place interests you because it is not clear. You attend. In your humility, you lay down the words carefully, watching all the angles. Now the earlier writing looks soft and careless. Process is nothing; erase your tracks. The path is not the work. I hope your tracks have grown over; I hope birds ate the crumbs; I hope you will toss it all and not look back.

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Written by Nicole Cerutti

Nicole Cerutti is a ballet-turned-modern dancer and arts enthusiast originally from Tampa Bay, Fla. Nicole pursued dance at Walnut Hill School for the Arts, Pittsburgh Ballet Theater, and earned a bachelor’s degree from Barnard College at Columbia University. She currently lives in Brooklyn with Holly Golightly the Cat.